FREE

VIRTUAL MANUFACTURING TRAINING

Funding by Executive Office of Housing & Economic Development

This pilot virtual self-paced program – supported by MASSHIRE Career Centers and a Tooling U Facilitator to provide support and guidance

Has COVID-19 impacted you or a loved one’s employment during the pandemic? The Northeast Advanced Manufacturing Consortium, supported by MassHire Career Centers, offers FREE virtual manufacturing training via the Tooling U platform.

Participants will use the Tooling U platform to receive high-quality competency-based training focusing on manufacturing in the areas of machine, tooling, and equipment education. Trainees will receive instruction on Manufacturing Industry Fundamentals and gain an understanding on many elements within Advanced Manufacturing throughout the Virtual Manufacturing Training Program

The curriculum is entirely self-paced and at-home, allowing flexible learning opportunities to accommodate those currently working part-time hours, taking care of loved ones, or anything else taking up a majority of your time. With accessible technical and academic guidance, participants fully receive the support required to participate, comprehend, and complete the program.

The virtual manufacturing training also provides participants with access to career center and job placement services, guiding program graduates towards the beginning of their promising careers in manufacturing. MassHire and NAMC also invite trainees to participate in virtual job fairs to connect with manufacturing employers throughout the state, alongside special access to advanced training programs.

Student Practice in Masks
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MassHire Northeast Region Virtual Manufacturing Training Program – 14 Tooling U-SME Courses (Up to 160 hours)

VMT Module 1: Manufacturing Career Awareness
  • Manufacturing 101

    “Manufacturing 101” provides a broad overview of the manufacturing process and industry. Manufacturing involves a wide range of processes that are used to turn materials into products. Many organizations work together in a supply chain to produce a product. Products start out as designs and are then produced from materials and assembled to create the final product.

    The manufacturing industry is a vast, diverse network of organizations that offers a wide variety of career opportunities. After taking this class, users will have a foundational understanding of the manufacturing industry and the various activities that are required to create a product. This will prepare them for further learning about specific manufacturing processes and considerations, as well as pursuing a career in manufacturing.

  • Careers in Manufacturing 102

    “Careers in Manufacturing 102” provides a foundational overview of various fields within the manufacturing industry and common tasks they involve. Manufacturing provides many different career opportunities and a range of pathways to them. Individuals can tailor their own paths to the level and field of their choosing. Major career fields include development and design, production, quality, maintenance, health and safety, logistics, and business.

    The manufacturing industry’s workforce needs are constantly changing, but manufacturers consistently report job openings, especially in skilled fields. After taking this class, users will be familiar with the variety of career opportunities and choices within manufacturing. This knowledge will help encourage and prepare them to select a career in manufacturing.

VMT Module 3: Basic Manufacturing Principles
  • Quality Overview 111

    “Quality Overview” provides a comprehensive introduction to the importance of quality and how to achieve it in both processes and products. A quality organization meets the needs of both internal and external customers. To do this, all the departments of an organization must work together and be equally focused on quality. Organizations use various methods, such as quality management systems and quality standards to ensure quality.

    After completing this class, users will have a greater understanding of how each department of an organization plays a role in achieving quality as well as common approaches to improving quality. This knowledge helps emphasize the importance of quality and prepares users to learn more about specific quality management methods so that they can help contribute to quality efforts. This leads to cost reduction and improved organizational success.

  • Lean Manufacturing Overview 101

    “Lean Manufacturing Overview” provides an introduction to the principles and terminology of lean strategies, including a discussion of the seven forms of waste, the definition of value-added, the difference between push and pull systems, and the importance of continuous improvement. This class also highlights other quality concepts, such as single minute exchange of dies (SMED), inventory reduction, and Five S.

    Lean manufacturing approaches help companies optimize their processes through organization and waste reduction. Although change can be a challenge, more efficient, streamlined processes will ultimately lead to improved customer satisfaction. This class outlines the foundational concepts and vocabulary that every practitioner needs when beginning, or continuing, a lean initiative.

  • Introduction to Assembly

    The class “Introduction to Assembly” provides an overview of the processes and methods used to assemble components into finished parts. Assembly is often performed on assembly lines, which may be manual, automated, or a combination of both. The three main assembly methods are mechanical fastening, adhesive bonding, and welding. Mechanical fastening uses fasteners to join components. Fasteners can join dissimilar materials, are inexpensive, and allow for disassembly. Adhesive bonding uses materials such as gels, liquids, or tapes to form a joint. Welding uses pressure, heat, or a combination of energy sources to create a very strong, permanent joint. These methods are sometimes used together.

    The information presented in this class serves as a foundation for users to learn more about, and eventually perform, fastening and assembly. Understanding the differences between different assembly methods prepares users to learn about the more detailed and complex aspects of each method.

VMT Module 4: OSHA-10
  • Introduction to OSHA 101

    “Intro to OSHA” provides an introduction to the purpose of OSHA and how its standards and guidelines affect employers and employees. Most U.S. workplaces are covered by OSHA, and its existence has greatly improved workplace safety. Some industries are not covered by OSHA, however, and some states have safety programs that take the place of OSHA. OSHA standards are enforceable by law. Compliance with OSHA standards is enforced by inspections and record keeping, which have specific steps and requirements. Employers and employees have different rights and responsibilities regarding OSHA standards.

    Both employers and employees benefit from basic knowledge about OSHA’s purpose, standards, and practices. Violations of OSHA standards are punishable by law and render the workplace unsafe for all personnel. A basic awareness of the standards, rights, and responsibilities will help employees to bolster workplace safety as well as keep the workplace legally compliant.

  • Personal Protective Equipement 111

    The class “Personal Protective Equipment” introduces the purpose and uses of personal protective equipment (PPE). As defined by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), PPE minimizes exposure to hazards and helps prevent injury. In order to select appropriate PPE, employers must first evaluate the workplace with a hazard assessment. PPE may be categorized by the area of the body it protects. PPE is available in several types, designs, and materials. Every employer is responsible for providing the appropriate PPE for workers who require it, and it is every employee’s responsibility to properly wear and use PPE. OSHA does not often specify which types of PPE should be worn, but requires that employers train each employee in proper use and retrain when PPE changes or if PPE is used improperly. After taking this class, users should be able to describe OSHA regulations regarding personal protective equipment and how they impact day-to-day operations in the workplace.

  • Safety for Metal Cutting 101

    “Safety for Metal Cutting” provides a comprehensive overview of the safety hazards associated with metal cutting operations, such as hot flying chips, broken tools, and rotating components. In addition, the class addresses contact with cutting fluids, which can cause skin and eye irritation, and machine guarding. Manual machines often require machine guards because the operator works in close proximity with the point of operation and moving components. CNC machines often have fixed guards, which prevent the operator from reaching into the point of operation. Also, operators must handle all sharp-edged tools properly.

    Awareness of potential safety hazards reduces the risk of operator injury. The key to cutting safety is to follow the proper guidelines for the facility and maintain a well-organized, safe work environment. After taking the class, users should be able to demonstrate awareness of and follow proper safety protocols in a metal-cutting environment.

VMT Module 5: Manufacturing Basics-Measurement and Mathematics
  • Basic Measurement 101

    The class “Basic Measurement” offers an overview of common gaging and variable inspection tools and methods. Variable inspection takes a specific measurement using common devices such as calipers and micrometers. The sensitivity of the instrument must be greater than the measurement being taken. Both calipers and micrometers are read by finding the alignments in lines on the devices. Gages, such as gage blocks, plug gages, ring gages, and thread gages, reveal whether a dimension is acceptable or unacceptable without a specific quantity. All inspection devices should be properly mastered and maintained to retain accuracy. One of the fundamental activities of any shop is the measurement of part features. Consistent measurement and inspection maintains standardization and ensures that out-of-tolerance parts do not reach customers. After taking this class, users should be able to describe the use and care of common inspection instruments and gages used in the production environment.

  • Math Fundamentals 101

    The class “Math Fundamentals” covers basic arithmetic operations, including addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Additionally, it introduces the concept of negative numbers and integers. The class concludes with an overview of the order of operations and grouping symbols.

    Basic mathematical operations are the foundations upon which all math relies. Mastery of these foundational tasks will ease a student into more complicated mathematics, such as algebra and geometry, both of which are commonly used in a variety of manufacturing environments.

VMT Module 6: Manufacturing Basics-Blueprint Reading
  • Blueprint Reading 131

    The class “Blueprint Reading” provides a thorough understanding of blueprints and how to read them. Blueprints are documents that contain three major elements: the drawing, dimensions, and notes. The drawing illustrates the views of the part necessary to show its features. Together, the extension and dimension lines on the drawing indicate dimensions and specific tolerance information of each feature. The notes contain administrative and global information about the part. A blueprint contains all instructions and requirements necessary to manufacture and inspect a part.

    An understanding of how to read a blueprint is critical to manufacture and inspect parts to accurate specifications. Accurate blueprint creation helps to ensure that finished parts will function in a way that meets the original intent. After taking this class, users should be able to read a basic blueprint and determine the critical features on a part that need to be measured.

VMT Module 7: Manufacturing Basics-Machining Operations and Techniques
  • Overview of Machine Tools 121

    “Overview of Machine Tools” provides an overview of the basic machine tools used in metal cutting operations. The class describes the appearance, components, and uses of lathes, mills, drill presses, saws, and broaches. Lathes and mills are described in detail, including the various types of cutting operations performed and the different types of tools commonly used on both machines.

    This class provides new users with the foundational information about machine tools and their uses that is necessary for users to gain familiarity with common metal cutting machines and knowledge of metal cutting theory and processes. A basic understanding of the types of machine tools used in metal cutting operations will prepare users for becoming machine operators.

  • Introduction to CNC Machines 201

    “Intro to CNC Machines” provides a comprehensive introduction to computer numerical control (CNC), which uses numerical data to control a machine. CNC machines rely on a system of three linear and three rotational axes in order to calculate the motion and position of machine components and workpieces. A machine control unit controls and guides the movements of the machine tool. This class also describes PTP positioning, which moves to the end position before the tool begins to cut, and continuous path systems that can move a tool along two or more axes at once and cut during the movement. Additionally, closed-loop systems provide feedback, while open-loop systems do not.

    CNC machines are used to make a variety of products using a number of different processes. With proper training, a human operator can use CNC machines to make accurate parts with decreased risk of error. After taking this class users should be able to describe common components of CNC machine tools and controls.

  • Introduction to Robotics 201

    “Introduction to Robotics” describes the basics of industrial robotics, including types, applications, and programming methods. Industrial robots are reprogrammable machines that can perform repetitive or dangerous tasks with a high degree of accuracy. Manufacturers increasingly use robots to perform such tasks in order to speed up production, improve part quality, and preserve operator safety. However, robots require human engineers and operators to program, maintain, repair, and oversee them.

    Industrial robots are highly complex machines that come in a number of types, including stationary robots and mobile robots. These robots are made of a number of intricate components that must be assembled and maintained properly. Similarly, all robots must be programmed to perform a task, and that programming can require adjusting. After taking this class, students will know the basic robot components, type, applications, and programming methods, as well as safety protocols.

Manufacturing CareerAwareness

Manufacturing 101

“Manufacturing 101” provides a broad overview of the manufacturing process and industry. Manufacturing involves a wide range of processes that are used to turn materials into products. Many organizations work together in a supply chain to produce a product. Products start out as designs and are then produced from materials and assembled to create the final product.

The manufacturing industry is a vast, diverse network of organizations that offers a wide variety of career opportunities. After taking this class, users will have a foundational understanding of the manufacturing industry and the various activities that are required to create a product. This will prepare them for further learning about specific manufacturing processes and considerations, as well as pursuing a career in manufacturing.

Careers in Manufacturing 102

“Careers in Manufacturing 102” provides a foundational overview of various fields within the manufacturing industry and common tasks they involve. Manufacturing provides many different career opportunities and a range of pathways to them. Individuals can tailor their own paths to the level and field of their choosing. Major career fields include development and design, production, quality, maintenance, health and safety, logistics, and business.

The manufacturing industry’s workforce needs are constantly changing, but manufacturers consistently report job openings, especially in skilled fields. After taking this class, users will be familiar with the variety of career opportunities and choices within manufacturing. This knowledge will help encourage and prepare them to select a career in manufacturing.

Basic Manufacturing Principles

Quality Overview 111

“Quality Overview” provides a comprehensive introduction to the importance of quality and how to achieve it in both processes and products. A quality organization meets the needs of both internal and external customers. To do this, all the departments of an organization must work together and be equally focused on quality. Organizations use various methods, such as quality management systems and quality standards to ensure quality.

After completing this class, users will have a greater understanding of how each department of an organization plays a role in achieving quality as well as common approaches to improving quality. This knowledge helps emphasize the importance of quality and prepares users to learn more about specific quality management methods so that they can help contribute to quality efforts. This leads to cost reduction and improved organizational success.

Lean Manufacturing Overview 101

“Lean Manufacturing Overview” provides an introduction to the principles and terminology of lean strategies, including a discussion of the seven forms of waste, the definition of value-added, the difference between push and pull systems, and the importance of continuous improvement. This class also highlights other quality concepts, such as single minute exchange of dies (SMED), inventory reduction, and Five S.

Lean manufacturing approaches help companies optimize their processes through organization and waste reduction. Although change can be a challenge, more efficient, streamlined processes will ultimately lead to improved customer satisfaction. This class outlines the foundational concepts and vocabulary that every practitioner needs when beginning, or continuing, a lean initiative.

Introduction to Assembly

The class “Introduction to Assembly” provides an overview of the processes and methods used to assemble components into finished parts. Assembly is often performed on assembly lines, which may be manual, automated, or a combination of both. The three main assembly methods are mechanical fastening, adhesive bonding, and welding. Mechanical fastening uses fasteners to join components. Fasteners can join dissimilar materials, are inexpensive, and allow for disassembly. Adhesive bonding uses materials such as gels, liquids, or tapes to form a joint. Welding uses pressure, heat, or a combination of energy sources to create a very strong, permanent joint. These methods are sometimes used together.

The information presented in this class serves as a foundation for users to learn more about, and eventually perform, fastening and assembly. Understanding the differences between different assembly methods prepares users to learn about the more detailed and complex aspects of each method.

OSHA -10

Introduction to OSHA 101

“Intro to OSHA” provides an introduction to the purpose of OSHA and how its standards and guidelines affect employers and employees. Most U.S. workplaces are covered by OSHA, and its existence has greatly improved workplace safety. Some industries are not covered by OSHA, however, and some states have safety programs that take the place of OSHA. OSHA standards are enforceable by law. Compliance with OSHA standards is enforced by inspections and record keeping, which have specific steps and requirements. Employers and employees have different rights and responsibilities regarding OSHA standards.

Both employers and employees benefit from basic knowledge about OSHA’s purpose, standards, and practices. Violations of OSHA standards are punishable by law and render the workplace unsafe for all personnel. A basic awareness of the standards, rights, and responsibilities will help employees to bolster workplace safety as well as keep the workplace legally compliant.

Personal Protective Equipement 111

The class “Personal Protective Equipment” introduces the purpose and uses of personal protective equipment (PPE). As defined by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), PPE minimizes exposure to hazards and helps prevent injury. In order to select appropriate PPE, employers must first evaluate the workplace with a hazard assessment. PPE may be categorized by the area of the body it protects. PPE is available in several types, designs, and materials. Every employer is responsible for providing the appropriate PPE for workers who require it, and it is every employee’s responsibility to properly wear and use PPE. OSHA does not often specify which types of PPE should be worn, but requires that employers train each employee in proper use and retrain when PPE changes or if PPE is used improperly. After taking this class, users should be able to describe OSHA regulations regarding personal protective equipment and how they impact day-to-day operations in the workplace.

Safety for Metal Cutting 101

“Safety for Metal Cutting” provides a comprehensive overview of the safety hazards associated with metal cutting operations, such as hot flying chips, broken tools, and rotating components. In addition, the class addresses contact with cutting fluids, which can cause skin and eye irritation, and machine guarding. Manual machines often require machine guards because the operator works in close proximity with the point of operation and moving components. CNC machines often have fixed guards, which prevent the operator from reaching into the point of operation. Also, operators must handle all sharp-edged tools properly.

Awareness of potential safety hazards reduces the risk of operator injury. The key to cutting safety is to follow the proper guidelines for the facility and maintain a well-organized, safe work environment. After taking the class, users should be able to demonstrate awareness of and follow proper safety protocols in a metal-cutting environment.

Manufacturing Basics: Measurement and Mathematics

Basic Measurement 101

The class “Basic Measurement” offers an overview of common gaging and variable inspection tools and methods. Variable inspection takes a specific measurement using common devices such as calipers and micrometers. The sensitivity of the instrument must be greater than the measurement being taken. Both calipers and micrometers are read by finding the alignments in lines on the devices. Gages, such as gage blocks, plug gages, ring gages, and thread gages, reveal whether a dimension is acceptable or unacceptable without a specific quantity. All inspection devices should be properly mastered and maintained to retain accuracy. One of the fundamental activities of any shop is the measurement of part features. Consistent measurement and inspection maintains standardization and ensures that out-of-tolerance parts do not reach customers. After taking this class, users should be able to describe the use and care of common inspection instruments and gages used in the production environment.

Math Fundamentals 101

The class “Math Fundamentals” covers basic arithmetic operations, including addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Additionally, it introduces the concept of negative numbers and integers. The class concludes with an overview of the order of operations and grouping symbols.

Basic mathematical operations are the foundations upon which all math relies. Mastery of these foundational tasks will ease a student into more complicated mathematics, such as algebra and geometry, both of which are commonly used in a variety of manufacturing environments.

Manufacturing Basics: Blueprint Reading

Blueprint Reading 131

The class “Blueprint Reading” provides a thorough understanding of blueprints and how to read them. Blueprints are documents that contain three major elements: the drawing, dimensions, and notes. The drawing illustrates the views of the part necessary to show its features. Together, the extension and dimension lines on the drawing indicate dimensions and specific tolerance information of each feature. The notes contain administrative and global information about the part. A blueprint contains all instructions and requirements necessary to manufacture and inspect a part.

An understanding of how to read a blueprint is critical to manufacture and inspect parts to accurate specifications. Accurate blueprint creation helps to ensure that finished parts will function in a way that meets the original intent. After taking this class, users should be able to read a basic blueprint and determine the critical features on a part that need to be measured.

Manufacturing Basics: Machining Operations and Techniques

Overview of Machine Tools 121

“Overview of Machine Tools” provides an overview of the basic machine tools used in metal cutting operations. The class describes the appearance, components, and uses of lathes, mills, drill presses, saws, and broaches. Lathes and mills are described in detail, including the various types of cutting operations performed and the different types of tools commonly used on both machines.

This class provides new users with the foundational information about machine tools and their uses that is necessary for users to gain familiarity with common metal cutting machines and knowledge of metal cutting theory and processes. A basic understanding of the types of machine tools used in metal cutting operations will prepare users for becoming machine operators.

Introduction to CNC Machines 201

“Intro to CNC Machines” provides a comprehensive introduction to computer numerical control (CNC), which uses numerical data to control a machine. CNC machines rely on a system of three linear and three rotational axes in order to calculate the motion and position of machine components and workpieces. A machine control unit controls and guides the movements of the machine tool. This class also describes PTP positioning, which moves to the end position before the tool begins to cut, and continuous path systems that can move a tool along two or more axes at once and cut during the movement. Additionally, closed-loop systems provide feedback, while open-loop systems do not.

CNC machines are used to make a variety of products using a number of different processes. With proper training, a human operator can use CNC machines to make accurate parts with decreased risk of error. After taking this class users should be able to describe common components of CNC machine tools and controls.

Introduction to Robotics 201

“Introduction to Robotics” describes the basics of industrial robotics, including types, applications, and programming methods. Industrial robots are reprogrammable machines that can perform repetitive or dangerous tasks with a high degree of accuracy. Manufacturers increasingly use robots to perform such tasks in order to speed up production, improve part quality, and preserve operator safety. However, robots require human engineers and operators to program, maintain, repair, and oversee them.

Industrial robots are highly complex machines that come in a number of types, including stationary robots and mobile robots. These robots are made of a number of intricate components that must be assembled and maintained properly. Similarly, all robots must be programmed to perform a task, and that programming can require adjusting. After taking this class, students will know the basic robot components, type, applications, and programming methods, as well as safety protocols.

The Process

  • Sign Up

    Interested individuals sign-up via the form below or by contacting their local MassHire Career Center and receiving the information necessary to get started.

  • Training

    Participants can receive up to 160 hours of machine, tooling, and equipment training, giving them a competitive advantage in finding and creating a successful manufacturing career.

Apply Now

Are you ready to take your first steps into the field of manufacturing? Fill out the form below to apply for the NAMC and MassHire’s free virtual manufacturing training program.

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